3 Ways to Explore
Employment

Plugging Into the Las Vegas Job Market
Your spouse has just been offered a promotion that requires relocating to the Las Vegas Valley. This is a wonderful opportunity for your family; however, it does pose a certain dilemma for you. You are now the “trailing spouse,” the person who follows a partner who is relocating to a new city. While your spouse is guaranteed a job, you are left to find one in an unfamiliar city. To assist you in your job search, this chapter of Relocating to Las Vegas has been designed to guide you through the process. The following pages offer an overview of the current Las Vegas job market, primary employment sectors, industry growth and employment resources.

LAS VEGAS VALLEY JOB MARKET
It is hard to discuss any U.S. job market without acknowledging the economic downturn that has led to job loss around the country. The good news is that national statistics, which are often a precursor to the Nevada job market, indicate steady yet slow turnaround. Furthermore, segments of Nevada’s private sector showed signs of life in 2011 with the addition of 2,100 jobs. According to Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), employers in the public service-providing industry added 7,000 jobs, and private-service providers added 11,700 jobs in 2011. As job growth returns, and at a faster pace, the city finds itself on the mend.

REGIONAL WORKFORCE
Southern Nevada has a regional workforce of more than 1 million that continues to grow as more people relocate to area. The largest employer is the Clark County School District with more than 38,000 employees on its payroll. The majority of Southern Nevada students choose to continue education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), making it the eighth largest employer behind the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police with nearly 5,500 employees. Some of the finest healthcare facilities have established a presence in the valley to meet the demands of a growing community. The 4,000 patient beds and more than 15,000 qualified physicians collectively are provided by 15 full-service hospitals. The area also is served by a number of major Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) and several nonprofit health-support organizations.

AREA GROWTH
In the last several years, many new and existing companies have decided that Las Vegas has a low tax and business-friendly operating environment perfectly suited for a successful company. These businesses, including Cricket Communications, Inc., TELUS Enterprise Solutions Corporation and College Loan Corporation, have provided a multimillion-dollar impact on the Las Vegas economy, according to the Nevada Development Authority.

A report issued in 2010 from the Center for Business and Economic Research states, “U.S. disposable income and consumption expenditures generally increased through the first six months of the year, consumer confidence is improving and measures of international economic activity are on the upswing, and we have seen some gains in Clark County gaming revenue, convention attendance, and visitor volume.”

STAFFING SERVICES
Many personnel and/or staffing services in Las Vegas offer full-time or temporary placement. Client companies pay the fee for most full-time personnel services. There are a few personnel services where the applicant pays the fee, so it is important to determine who is responsible for any fees before registering with a service.

Many Las Vegas companies utilize temporary positions for an assortment of position types. Several temporary services specialize in specific types of jobs. Search online for companies in your neighborhood and call to find out what types of services they provide and if they have particular employment specialties. In a timid job market, temporary hires often turn into full-time positions. In fact, many companies prefer to hire through the temp-to-hire process. It gives both the applicant and the company a trial period before the temporary employee converts to the company’s full-time payroll.

NETWORKING—VIRTUALLY AND IN PERSON
In this digital age, face-to-face networking seems to have fallen by the wayside, but studies indicate that more jobs are found through referrals than through online job searches. To network, jobseekers should contact everyone they know in their professional life. Jobseekers should be prepared to explain quickly about their skills and recent experience. Commonly referred to as the “15-second elevator speech,” being prepared with this overview can make a big difference. To learn more, visit www.15secondpitch.com, where you can discover ways to focus your thinking on what is most important.

Another useful online tool now essential for networkers and jobseekers is to join LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com), an online network of more than 25 million experienced professionals from around the world, representing 150 industries. By staying “linked in” with your professional network, you’re always connected to people who may know of open positions or know of a contact at a company you might be interested in approaching. It’s about being more effective in your daily work and opening doors to opportunities using the professional relationships you already have.

RELOCATING TO LAS VEGAS PARTNERS
Relocating to Las Vegas’ NIXOR directory at www.LVRelocationGuide.org works with local Las Vegas Valley businesses to provide an overview of company history and workplace environment as well as available positions. These companies seek to hire the best talent moving to the Las Vegas area and have your information and résumé sent to their Human Resources (HR) department directly. Use the NIXOR job board to request more information and apply for job opportunities before your move to help you hit the ground running when you arrive in the valley. It is one-stop shopping for learning about your new city and joining the workforce.

EMPLOYMENT RESOURCES
As a trailing spouse, you may find that your partner’s employer can offer you relocation assistance, including job-finding services. Before you move, contact your partner’s HR department to see if these services are available. Often, it is most advantageous to contact the HR department in Las Vegas because the local personnel may know more about the local job market.

Also be sure to conduct your own preliminary research and take full advantage of local employment resources. Gather local newspapers to search through the classified ads and use the Internet to search for industries of interest and corresponding companies based in Las Vegas. Use networking to your advantage by talking to people in the community and in your neighborhood. Visit the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce to get acquainted with local businesses and attend events.

A number of national websites, such as www.academic360.com and www.careersingovernment.com focus solely on a particular field, which can help target positions applicable to your skills. Nevada JobConnect (www.nevadajobconnect.com) is a statewide network that connects businesses with employees, all in one convenient system.

Professionals also can find contacts by attending seminars, conferences, community meetings, volunteer groups, hobby clubs and professional association activities. Las Vegas is home to local chapters of professional development associations in various fields. Search online to find out if there is a Las Vegas chapter affiliated with your profession. Following are a few notable organizations that may match your interest and career skills.

The American Marketing Association, Las Vegas Chapter (www.amalasvegas.com), is a professional association for individuals and organizations involved in the practice, teaching and study of marketing worldwide.

The Nevada Restaurant Association (www.nvrestaurants.com) is the leading business association serving the needs of food-service operators in Nevada.

Southern Nevada Human Resources Association (SNHRA) (www.snhra.org) is the premier professional association for human resources professionals in the southern part of the region. SNHRA has nearly 500 members, representing more than 390 organizations.
Greater Las Vegas Association of REALTORS® (www.glvar.com) was founded in 1947 and provides its more than 14,000 local members with education, training and political representation.

The International Association of Administrative Professionals, Las Vegas Valley Chapter (www.lvvalley-iaap.org), has the mission to enhance the success of career-minded administrative professionals by providing opportunities for growth through education, community building and leadership development.

OPTIMIZING YOUR RÉSUMÉ
Not so long ago, résumés were printed on quality paper and presented in an envelope to potential employers. While it still is a jobseeker’s most important sales tool, the rules of the résumé game have changed. Yes, it’s still critical that you create a quality and accurate document that emphasizes your skills and experience and that you customize each cover letter you send. What has changed is that you’re no longer presenting a résumé that appealing to the human eye; now it needs to be computer-optimized using important keywords.

To ensure that your résumé gets noticed in a search, use as many keywords as possible. Following are some tips to get you started:
  • Use keywords that emphasize technical and professional areas of expertise (e.g., software engineer, purchasing agent, marketing manager, administrative assistant). The Ladders’ website (www.theladders.com) has a list of top recruiter keywords. These are the most popular words recruiters have searched for in a given week, and it’s constantly changing.
  • Use applicable acronyms and industry terminology, such as TCP/IP, C ++, RAD; MRPII, Windows Server 2008; Microsoft Excel, Computer Assisted Audit Techniques, Computer Aided Audit Tools (CAATS), Computer Assisted Audit Tools and Techniques (CAATTs).
  • Use education or certification terms; familiar ones include Certified Network Administrator (CNA), bachelors of science in computer science (or other field), Certified Public Accountant (CPA) and Six Sigma Black Belt.

According to experts, after résumés are scanned into the applicant-tracking systems, they will be searched and ranked. A hiring manager determines the keywords that best identify the skills needed in a candidate for a particular position; several keywords will be mandatory while others will be desirable. Based on those keywords, the system performs a search, and résumés are ranked according to the number of keyword matches. A résumé that has more of the desired keywords ranks higher and will get reviewed sooner.

So no worries if you’ve followed someone here and now need to find a job yourself. In Las Vegas, the jobs are there; you just need to go out and find them.

 
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